Classes

There will be four class sessions. Depending on the number of registrants, it is planned to offer four classes per session. We want to tailor the classes to our registrants, so during registration up to June 7, we will ask you to pick your first, second, third, and fourth choices from the listing of six classes offered. The general class names are listed below. The detailed class descriptions follow the session choices.

Class Session 1 Choices (no more than four will be selected)

  • Bell Trees
  • Multiple Bell Techniques
  • No Really, Music Theory Isn’t Scary!
  • Repertoire Remedies (Help with conference music)
  • Small Ensemble Techniques (Sharing, moving together etc.)
  • Youth Track (Rehearsal) – Those participating with the youth will be REQUIRED to take this class.

Class Session 2  Choices (no more than four will be selected)

  • 2-5 Octave Music Reading Session
  • 8-12 Bell Music Reading Session
  • Articulations (those pesky symbols)
  • Multiple Bell Techniques 
  • Repertoire Remedies (Help with conference music)
  • Youth Track (Rehearsal) – Those participating with the youth will be REQUIRED to take this class.

Class Session 3  Choices (no more than four will be selected)

  • 2-5 Octave Music Reading Session
  • Handbell Heptathlon
  • It’s Not Always a Nail (4-in-hand and more)
  • No Really, Music Theory Isn’t Scary!
  • Repertoire Remedies (Help with conference music)
  • Stevie Berryman – Why I do the things I do with food

Class Session 4  Choices (no more than four will be selected)

  • 8-12 Bell Music Reading Session
  • Handbell Heptathlon
  • Conducting — Is It Really All About “The Beat”?
  • Repertoire Remedies (Help with conference music)
  • Stevie Berryman – Why I do the things I do with balls
  • Youth Track (Rehearsal) – Those participating with the youth will be REQUIRED to take this class

    2-5 Octave Music Reading Session

    What to ring some more? Come and ring a selection of 2-3, 2-5, 3-5 octave music with your handbell friends.

    8-12 Bells Music Reading Session

    Several bell ensembles are down in numbers and have found the 8-12 bell music a great solution. In this session, you will have the opportunity to ring a variety of 8-12 bell pieces. In addition, you will learn how to identify the important notes that need to be brought out. 

    Articulations (those pesky symbols)

    In this class you will identify and define handbell articulations used in handbell music and how to successfully execute them with musical finesse.

    Bell Trees

    You, too, can play a bunch of bells without the choreography needed for table solo ringing. We will discuss and practice how to hang the bells up, how to mallet, how to pick music and how to get creative.

    Conducting – Is It Really All About “The Beat”?

    This is for the ringer or conductor at any level, asking: “What is conducting really about?” Was “the beat” the first thing you learned about? Have some conductors never escaped that rut? Is there a more musical way to start learning to conduct a handbell ensemble? We draw upon Dalcroze, Strepka/Laban, Green, Boonshaft, Czikszentmihályi, and Bernstein, applying movement, flow, inner sense, psychological conducting, reimagining what we do as directors and ringers— even at Level 1 – even AWAY from the table!

    Handbell Heptathalon

    So, you have been doing what you love – ringing, but have you been missing the thrill of friendly competition that is associated with the Olympics, baseball, friendly family flag football, etc? If so, Handbell Heptathlon is the place for you. Seven events in forty-five minutes. This class will test both your mental and ringing prowess. The champions will be crowned at the final massed ring. Who will win the tin, copper and bronze medals?

    It’s Not Always a Nail

    All of our handbell techniques give us great tools to make beautiful handbell music. But how do we determine which tool to use in our music, both as a soloist or in an ensemble setting? This class will review various treble bell techniques including traditional solo ringing tools and how to apply these techniques to all styles of ringing. Having a working knowledge of weaving and four-in-hand techniques is helpful, but not required for this class.

    Multiple Bell Techniques

    You have to ring more than 2 bells, so how do you do that without crossing hands, breaking the legato line, or passing out in a panic? How many different ways are there to ring more than one bell in a hand? We’ll explore all the various techniques: how to pick up on the fly, kinds of grips, how to ring each bell separately and together, damping tricks, helpful hints.

    No Really, Music Theory Isn’t Scary!

    Feel daunted by those V7 chords? Ever wonder what a supertonic is? This class will explain some of the fundamentals of music theory in a way everyone can understand. Knowing the structure of a piece of music makes it easier to play and harder to lose your place. We’ll use the conference music for examples. There will be Oreos.

    Repertoire Remedies

    Perhaps your preparation time for the concert was not as much as you needed. Spend the class working with the instructor to solve your and others pesky problems.

    Small Ensemble Techniques (Sharing, moving together, etc.)

    Small handbell ensembles (usually quartets) are often composed of more experienced ringers who assume that “small” means “difficult.” Even then the music might be more like a puzzle to be conquered than fluid performance. But what if we taught small ensembles from the very beginning as a means of teaching the most fundamental ringing techniques and musical sense? In this class simple, melodious, harmonious, even familiar tunes in SATB texture are used to teach four to six ringers graceful strokes, precise rhythm, good tone, multiple-bell technique, passing, exchanging, articulation, notation, and musical expression.

    Stevie Berryman – Why I Do the Things I Do

    In this interactive class, our clinician will explain, demonstrate and teach some of the fun things that she uses to get the most out of her ringers and present her ensembles as musical artists to be respected and revered. There are two different classes, what Stevie can teach ringers using food and what Stevie can teach ringers using balls.

    Youth Rehearsal

    Calling all youth! For the Sunday concert, let’s perform our own piece, “I’m Just a Poor Wayfaring Stranger” arranged by Tammy Waldrop. There’s lots of fun things to do in this piece like mallets, thumb damps, shakes, gyros, tower swings, echoes, chimes and vibrato. Who knows? We might invent and add a few new ones ourselves! Rehearsals for this piece are scheduled during class sessions 1, 2, and 4 as the Youth Track. Please register for all three sessions. Those participating with the youth will be REQUIRED to take this class. So much fun packed into one piece!