2016 Area 12 Conference Track List

Thursday Tracks

Leader of the Pack: Directors’ WorkshopKimberlee Strepka, Michéle Sharik, Tessique Houston, Barbara Walsh and Kendra Scott, clinicians
Are you the Leader of the Pack? If you have been one for a while, or you are just starting to lead a group, come join us for this session that will delve into all the ins and outs of being that leader. We will cover such subjects as Score Prep, Rehearsal Techniques, Conducting, Assigning, Recruitment, and Selection of Literature. Instruction provided by one of our main conference clinicians and leaders of Area 12 (Chair, Chair-Elect, Nevada and Bay Area Regional Coordinators) will ensure that you get lots of great info. Dinner is provided. You will walk away with plenty of tools to soup up your handbell program!

Bronze Cruisers Ensemble — by Audition Only
Area 12 offers the chance for intermediate to advanced ringers to play more difficult music in a showcased choir setting under the direction of Michael Glasgow. This elite track begins on Thursday, June 16th at 1:00 PM and ends with a Friday lunch concert. Michael will choose several from the six pieces for the concert. Check out the music and application music here.

Friday Morning Tracks

Suzuki Solo RingingChristine Andersen, clinician
For those who have either never rung a solo, or who are just beginning, this class starts at square one and works on logistics, technique, and musicality. Taught by Area 12’s Central Valley Regional Coordinator, and one of the Guild’s most experienced handbell soloists, this class will introduce you to the art of solo ringing.

Basic 4-In-HandP. L. Grove, clinician (Repeated on Saturday am)
Learn the basics of the 4-in-Hand technique from the President-Elect of Handbell Musicians of America. P.L. Grove will take you through step-by-step, e.g. how to hold the bells, when to use Shelley vs. 4-in-Hand, and how to select your primary and secondary bell. Not only that, you will go beyond the basics into some music examples to show you how to save your hands and be true to the music.

All Ring 1 for the Rabid Handbell RingerKaren Carlisle, clinician
If you just can’t get enough of playing handbells — this class is for you! In All Ring 1, you will have the chance to ring through several pieces, Level 1–2. You will get to brush up on your sight-reading skills and really enjoy ringing with a variety of ringers. Participants must bring a binder and gloves, music will be provided when you get there. Please note that that there is an extra charge of $20 in this track for the music, so not only can you mark it, it will be yours to keep.

The Basics and BeyondMichéle Sharik, clinician (Repeated on Saturday am)
Whether you are a brand new beginner or a veteran, this session will teach (or remind) you what to do before you ever pick up a bell or chime. Ringers will be introduced to the Three S’s: Stance, Seat and Stroke, and will focus on developing a relaxed ringing style to help control the bell, ring dynamically and make beautiful music.
So now you can ring and damp. The second half of this track will focus on how to execute techniques including martellato, tap pluck, thumb damp, sing, shake, swing, gyro, echo, vibrato, and even a ring touch that won’t leave a mark! We’ll also learn the notation indicators for these techniques and which work (and how to modify them) for handchimes.

If Bells Grew on TreesLinda Krantz, clinician
Belltrees are a unique and interesting way to include bells when ringers or space are at a premium. This track will provide an opportunity for directors and ringers to learn the many ways belltrees can enhance concerts or worship, and provide expanded opportunities for ringers who wish to take their ringing to another level. This is a fun and exciting class with lots of hands-on experience. Come see what the buzz is all about!

So You’re Going to be a DirectorBarbara Walsh, clinician (Repeated on Saturday pm)
It happens to so many of us: you’re happily ringing in your choir, when suddenly the director moves away and there is no one to take over. You do not want to see the group fold, so you step up to the podium and take on the job of being the director. However, not having done this before, you could probably use some help. That is what this track is for! It will include discussion of goals, characteristics of a good director, simple score study and sharing of rehearsal tips. You will also get practice conducting patterns and cueing, followed by practice conducting an actual group of ringers; i.e., participants will ring when not conducting. This will provide a great opportunity to get some positive and constructive feedback!

Bronze Cruisers Ensemble — by Audition Only
Area 12 offers the chance for intermediate to advanced ringers to play more difficult music in a showcased choir setting under the direction of Michael Glasgow. This elite track begins on Thursday, June 16th at 1:00 PM and ends with a Friday lunch concert. Michael will choose several from the six pieces for the concert. Check out the music and application music here.

Friday Afternoon Tracks

All Ring 2 for the Rabid Handbell RingerMel Tully, clinician
If you just can’t get enough of playing handbells — this class is for you! In All Ring 2, you will have the chance to ring through several pieces, Level 2–3. You will get to brush up on your sight-reading skills and really enjoy ringing with a variety of ringers. Participants must bring a binder and gloves, music will be provided when you get there. Please note that there is an extra charge of $20 in this track for the music, so not only can you mark it it, it will be yours to keep.

Musicality Through MotionKimberlee Strepka, clinician
Although our instrument is often thought of as limited in flexibility, the vocabulary of Movement Theorist Rudolf Laban provides us with the tools for enhanced sonic and visual expressivity. Ringers come to us with movement preferences they have developed by adulthood. Because these preferences cause our ringers to approach the instrument with different movement attitudes, the resulting sound can be non-descript or lacking in distinguishing characteristics of style. In this full track, participants will learn the basics of Movement Theory, use movement vocabulary to describe the elements of movement, and discover their own personal movement profiles, i.e. their ringing assets and liabilities. We will then explore expanded sonic and visual possibilities for performance, teaching with intentionality of sound, two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional ringing, and stopped techniques, as well as ringing through pieces using all of the principles learned.

Theory-etically Speaking with MichaelMichael Glasgow, clinician
What is a Major chord? Minor chord? How do I build a scale? This class will lead you into the basics of Music Theory. You will start to get a grasp on how music is structured and why we need to know it. From the building blocks to the things we hear, you will experience it all.

Handbells Beyond the Church SettingDerek Nance, clinician
How do you organize and run a Community/Professional Handbell Ensemble? Derek will take you through the ins and out of the process — with input from various handbell musicians that are involved in Community/Professional groups. You will come away with lots of different ideas and perspectives about what makes these groups so successful, and how to use those ideas to start, or improve, your own group.

Handbells…The Percussion InstrumentMichael Wachs, clinician (Repeated on Saturday pm)
Handbells are percussion, and we are percussionists. Improve your skills in one of the essential techniques of percussion — malleting. You will get practical examples of exercises that can be used to improve your mallet technique — get the right grip and learn to move so that your mallet work is even, effortless, clean and fast.

4-in-Hand Quartet RingingChristine Anderson, clinician
Why 4-in-hand quartets? What’s the benefit? How do you do it? What music to ring? From learning how to hold, ring, damp quartet style to repertoire to creative ideas — this is the track for those who are ready for small ensemble challenges.

All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Bell Rehearsal — Intermediate DirectingMartin Morley, clinician
How much time do you have for rehearsal? No matter how long or short your rehearsals, it is a challenge to know the best way to make use of that precious time. You need options — and this class will give you sixty tips on techniques, rehearsal strategies, group building and performance that are helpful for both directors and ringers!

How Many Bells Can I Hold in my Hand?Mary Liao and Michéle Sharik, clinicians
Would a six-handed ringer be beneficial to your choir/ensemble? Learn the concept, method, and applications for the Perpendicular 6-in-Hand. Mary will show you what method to use to hold it, how to use it, travel, scoop & quick release. Learn to gracefully pick up extra bells & exercises to advance your techniques. Michéle will show you some alternative methods of holding multiple bells in your hands. You will be able to find the technique that works best for you.

Bass Bells — The Cool Kids on the RightMarquise Usher (Repeated on Saturday pm)
Don’t let those large bass bells intimidate you! With proper ergonomic technique, even petite individuals can ring bass bells safely. Use your brain rather than your brawn, and get physics on your side. Learn how to get the bells out of “keyboard order” to make it easier to reach them, and how to work as a team with the other ringers at the table. Then you can join all the cool kids as we lay down the bass for the rest of those cats.

Saturday Morning Tracks

Basic 4-In-HandP. L. Grove, clinician (Repeat from Friday am)
Learn the basics of the 4-in-Hand technique from the President-Elect of Handbell Musicians of America. P.L. Grove will take you through, step-by-step, e.g., how to hold the bells, when to use Shelley vs. 4-in-Hand and how to select your primary and secondary bell. Not only that, you will go beyond the basics into some music examples to show you how to save your hands and be true to the music.

Intermediate Solo RingingLinda Krantz, clinician
So, you’ve mastered weaving and passing and are enjoying playing solos. What’s next? Traveling 4iH! The perfect melding of weaving and 4iH, this class will teach you the ins and outs of Nancy Hascal’s famed traveling four-in-hand style of solo ringing. We will also look at rehearsal techniques and performance issues, ensuring a confident performance. Be prepared to up your game!!! The required pre-requisite is a working knowledge of weaving and the ring/knock (push) method of 4iH.

What is With all the Dots and Words on This PageMichael Glasgow, clinician
Rhythm Is Gonna Get You
— Michael will begin this track with an addictive rhythm game, and lead participants through various drill sessions to help fire up those rhythm skills so you’ll be a far out hot-rodder. Group and individual (for those brave cats) rhythmic sightreading will be experienced, as will the multitude of dots, ties, tuplets and syncopation. You’ll explore mixed meter, so that things like 7/8 time won’t make you want to cut out of the music scene!
Performance Markings — How do you follow all those extra markings on the page? Well, Michael will clue you in. Where to go when you see a repeat sign, 1st ending, 2nd ending, coda, etc. It will all get laid out in way that’s easy as pie to follow.

Handbell Maintenance — All Makes WelcomeChristine Anderson & Derek Nance, clinicians
Like any cool 50’s automobile, when you rotate the tires and change the fluids on a regular basis the life of your cruising days will be extended. So, it is with handbell maintenance … regular attention to items that may be too loose or too tight, cracked, worn or even dull, will help keep your bells in running order, not to mention the life-long wear of many miles of notes! All makes are welcome here — Malmark and Schulmerich. Bring your ailing bells and questions and we will show you how to fix the problems, and give you ideas you won’t hear anywhere else!

Tone Chime Materials and Techniques for Children — A Musical, Colorful, Creative Path for Developing a Tone Chime Ensemble  — Dr. Ginger Covert Colla, clinician
This interactive, hands-on session will focus on innovative teaching techniques for playing tone chimes and fostering musical literacy for children. The session will introduce the world of Rainbow Solfège, a unique visual, auditory and kinesthetic method for teaching tone chimes. This session will enable directors to discover the power inherent in adding colors specific to their function within the diatonic system to their collection of effective teaching tools.

Applying Principles of Music Therapy and Behavioral Science to Rehearsals — Intermediate DirectingMartin Morley, clinician
What is music therapy? How do you teach a pigeon to bowl? And what do these things have to do with me as a handbell director? This class is good for everyone from beginning director to experienced pro.

The Basics and BeyondMichéle Sharik, clinician (Repeat from Friday am)
Whether you are a brand new beginner or a veteran, this session will teach (or remind) you what to do before you ever pick up a bell or chime. Ringers will be introduced to the Three S’s: Stance, Seat and Stroke, and will focus on developing a relaxed ringing style to help control the bell, ring dynamically and make beautiful music.
So now you can ring and damp. Can you martellato? Tap pluck? Thumb damp? Make it sing? The second half of this track will focus on how to execute these special techniques and more, including shake, swing, gyro, echo, vibrato, and even a ring touch that won’t leave a mark! We’ll also learn the notation indicators for these techniques and which work (and how to modify them) for handchimes.

All Ring 3 for the Rabid Handbell RingerKimberly Strepka, clinician
If you just can’t get enough of playing handbells — this class is for you! In All Ring 3, you will have the chance to ring through several pieces, Level 3–4. You will get to brush up on your sight-reading skills and really enjoy ringing with a variety of ringers. Participants must bring a binder and gloves, music will be provided when you get there. Please note that that there is an extra charge of $20 in this track for the music so you can mark your music and it and it will be yours to keep.

Saturday Afternoon Tracks

All Ring 4 for the Rabid Handbell RingerMichael Glasgow, clinician
If you just can’t get enough of playing handbells — this class is for you! In All Ring 4, you will have the chance to ring through several pieces, Level 4–5. You will get to brush up on your sight-reading skills and really enjoy ringing with a variety of ringers. Participants must bring a binder and gloves, music will be provided when you get there. Please note that that there is an extra charge of $20 in this track for the music so you can mark it and it will be yours to keep.

Advanced Solo RingingLinda Krantz, clinician
This is it; you’re ready to take your solo ringing to the next level! This track will focus on tried and true methods of blocking an un-choreographed piece that will allow fluent and musical solo ringing, based on Nancy Hascall’s famed traveling 4iH techniques. We will be looking at rehearsal techniques, solo concert components, performance pressures and all those little things that result in a confident performance. Required pre-requisite — a working (passing) knowledge of traveling 4iH.

Youth and MovementKimberlee Strepka, clinician
Working with Youth
— Youth, and particularly teens, can be a challenging age group to work with when it comes to retention, choice of repertoire, and group dynamics. This workshop will provide insight into creating a youth ensemble that empowers the ringers and provides a culturally relevant performance platform for its members. Four foundational values will be discussed at length: Relationship, Repertoire, Responsibility, and Relevance.
Exploring the Movement within the Music — Because music moves through time and is created through movement, it can be analyzed, described, and taught to your ringers using the vocabulary of Movement Theorist, Rudolf Laban. Listening for the movement within different styles of music, identifying the distinguishing elements, choosing repertoire based on movement, and Laban Movement Score Analysis (LMSA) will be discussed. You’ll never listen to music the same way again once you’ve learned the language of movement.

Handbells…The Percussion InstrumentMichael Wachs, clinician
Handbells are percussion, and we are percussionists. Improve your skills in one of the essential techniques of percussion — malleting. You will get practical examples of exercises that can be used to improve your mallet technique — get the right grip and learn to move so that your mallet work is even, effortless, clean and fast.

Learning to Play as an EnsembleP.L. Grove, clinician
There’s more to ensemble ringing than just the ability to weave! From defining the term to choreography and presentation, come and find out the intricacies of ensemble ringing. Experience your ensemble “aha!” moment as you learn to weave, match styles, ring without a director and read solo and ensemble notation. Gain a new confidence in your ability to choose music, assign bells, memorize your music and perform musically in a small group. Bring your gloves, a willing attitude to share, and be prepared to have fun!

Bass Bells — The Cool Kids on the RightMarquise Usher (Repeat from Friday pm)
Don’t let those large bass bells intimidate you! With proper ergonomic technique, even petite individuals can ring bass bells safely. Use your brain rather than your brawn, and get physics on your side. Learn how to get the bells out of “keyboard order” to make it easier to reach them, and how to work as a team with the other ringers at the table. Then you can join all the cool kids as we lay down the bass for the rest of those cats.

The Creative Process for Handbell Ringers and Directors (Lecture Demonstration) — Rich Colla, clinician
Handbells and chimes can be essential for enhancing the worship experience and education. This session will address several topics for ringers and directors in the church setting, community and in education. This session will explore many topics including: musicianship and phrasing for ringers, the hierarchy of ringing (bringing out what is important in the music), possibilities for using chimes and extended techniques in bell music, selection of repertoire in general and for special events or special parts of the service, helping ringers to improve their technique, welcoming new ringers, and improvement tips for directors.

Sunday Tracks

At The HopMichael Glasgow and Kimberly Strepka, clinicians
Join your level – Division A Skylarks or Division B Thunderbirds and come prepared to play under the batons of our two wonderful conductors. We will also play several pieces together. The repertoire is available on conference web site. No photocopies allowed. The final performance is on Sunday, June 19th at 3:30 pm. Everyone is invited!

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